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Ohio mothers who have decided to create an estate plan have taken an important step in making sure their families are provided for in the future. But sometimes the unforeseen can still happen to delay or imperil your estate plans, such as the destruction of your estate plan documents in a natural disaster. To safeguard your will and other estate documents, there are several options experts recommend.

According to CNBC, in the opinion of estate experts, original estate documents should be stored in a secured location within your home. People sometimes store their important papers within a fireproof safe, but anyplace in your home that is secure should suffice. It is also wise to make copies and store them in different locations. Sometimes people do not feel safe keeping original documents in their home and opt to store them or copies with their attorney.

In today’s internet age, more and more people are choosing to digitize their documents and store them online. There are online tools that allow people to consolidate digital copies of their important documents in one place and allow them to be accessed later by family members or an executor of the estate. However, not everyone is comfortable with this choice. Some people may not be familiar with online storage or have concerns about their documents remaining secure online.

You might consider putting your estate documents in a safety deposit box, but experts do not recommend this option. The problem is that when you pass away, safety deposit boxes cannot be easily accessed. If the box does not have another name on it, the box is frozen, and your children or heirs may have to go through probate court to access the box and its papers.

Even if you have your children helping you with making digital copies of your estate documents, keeping your originals safe is vital since some institutions may not accept digitized copies. Fortunately, you are not alone. A qualified estate attorney can help you answer questions about how to safely store your estate documents and make sure your family can access them without trouble.

Since the estate planning needs of Ohio families will vary, do not read this article as legal advice. It is only intended as general information.