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Theft in Ohio is a serious matter. Sometimes, however, the punishment may not include jail time. Depending on the amount allegedly taken, a charge of theft may result in either a misdemeanor or a felony charge, according to Ohio’s Laws and Rules. For cash or property worth more than $1,000 the offense is a felony. 

Before someone charged with theft learns about his or her punishment, a jury must first decide to convict. Under certain circumstances, an individual charged with a felony theft offense may admit to his or her own actions and avoid a jury trial. This may result in the court deciding on a more lenient sentence in exchange for the admission of wrongdoing and the accused’s cooperation. 

In one such case, a Buckeye State resident received a suspended jail sentence after facing a theft charge. His alleged crime was taking more than $3,000 from a high school music club. A suspended sentence generally allows an individual to stay out of jail. He or she, however, must typically agree to other conditions as ordered by the court. 

As reported by the Wilmington News Journal, the former club treasurer agreed to probation and to not commit any more offenses for two years. The judge also ordered him not to handle any money for non-profit organizations. He is also unable to work for an organization in a position of trust. 

While he had time to think about his upcoming case, the former treasurer decided to plead guilty. He admitted to taking the funds from the club and accepted the court’s conditions. The court then enabled him to stay out of jail and not face a jury.